IMAGES

Selected images from Campania In-Felix. You can see more images from this project here. All images are copyright Matt Nager.

Mario Cannavacciuolo, a sheep herder, stands on his abandoned land in the country side outside Acerra, Italy. The Cannavacciuolo family has been destroyed by illegal toxic waste disposal and a government sponsored garbage incinerator which was constructed adjacent to their land. His flock of sheep, of about 3000, died due to dioxin contamination. His brother, Enzo Cannavacciuolo, died shortly after, and tests show his body contained levels of dioxin, purins, and PCBs 30 times the amount allowed by the World Health Organization. The Cannavacciuolo family no longer earns money off the land which has been in their family for generations. Photo by Matt Nager

 

A federally funded waste incinerator stands adjacent to Mario Cannavacciuolo's abandoned land in the country side outside Acerra, Italy, Thursday, July 1, 2010. The Cannavacciuolo family has been destroyed by illegal toxic waste disposal as his flock of sheep, of about 3000, died due to dioxin contamination. His brother, Enzo Cannavacciuolo (cq), died shortly after, and tests show his body contained levels of dioxin, purins, and PCBs 30 times the amount allowed by the World Health Organization. Photo by Matt Nager

 

An emaciated and dying sheep walks the land of Mario Cannavacciuolo, a sheep herder, in the country side outside Acerra, Italy. Photo by Matt Nager

Plants and large amounts of lichen grow on the incredibly fertile flow plane of the most recent eruption of Mount Vesuvius which occurred in March 1944. Due to the nutrients delivered by volcanic eruptions to the agricultural land surrounding Mount Vesuvius, the Campania region of Southern Italy contains some of the most fertile soil in all of Europe. Produce from the region has been prized the world over and has been a key ingredient and export for all Italian cooking. Photo by Matt Nager

Alessandro Cannavacciuolo, sits with piles of newspaper clippings and other documents of his families struggles with illegal toxic waste disposal on their farm in Acerra, Italy. Photo by Matt Nager

Old televisions, computers, tires, asbestos and toxic chemicals lie abandoned under a bridge near Acerra, Italy. While organized crime can blamed for much of the illegal toxic waste dumping from Northern Italian companies, local citizens have, as well, become accustomed to illegal dumping of waste leading to further contamination of the countryside. Photo by Matt Nager

Bruna Gambardella, sits in the patio at her home in Saviano, Italy. Gambardella, has experienced endometriosis and a weakened immune system due to high levels of PCBs accumulated in ground water and produce found in Marigliano. In 2008, Antonino Vassallo, a member of the Camorra, confessed to dumping toxic waste into the countryside around the provinces of Naples and Caserta. Gambardella has turned to organic farms to avoid eating local produce and has noticed some relief of health symptoms and a rise in energy. Photo by Matt Nager

Antonio Marfella, an oncologist, is the leading doctor currently doing testing of people with health issues coming from the country side outside Naples. Recent cutbacks in funding has delayed future testing and dramatically illustrates the struggles linking the rise in health issues with illegal waste disposal. Photo by Matt Nager

A burned out car and piles of illegally disposed computers, trash, and toxic chemicals lie abandoned next to farm land near Marigliano, Italy. While organized crime can blamed for much of the illegal toxic waste dumping from Northern Italian companies, local citizens have, as well, become accustomed to illegal dumping of waste leading to further contamination of the countryside. Photo by Matt Nager

Francesco Cipolletta, an agent with Corpo Forestale dello Stato, the federal forestry department, stands after marking and documenting a found urban waste pile in the countryside between Nola and Marigliano, Italy. The Corpo Forestale dello Stato is a government agency in charge of running missions documenting actual illegal waste disposal and securing found waste sites. These sites often take years to be cleaned up and disposed of due to bureaucratic hold ups. Photo by Matt Nager

Genarro Esposito, an environmental activist, doctor, and member a non-profit organization called Doctors for the Environment stands under a bridge where toxic waste has been buried. Esposito, who lives in Saviano, has worked for several years documenting and uncovering waste sites and looking into health issues that result from contamination. Photo by Matt Nager

Giuseppe Esposito, a local farmer and ex-police officer inside his organic farm in Marigliano, Italy, June 24, 2010. Esposito, who openly discusses his lack of action and participation in illegal waste disposal in the past, now grows his own organic food and condemns the continuation of waste disposal in the land around his city. Photo by Matt Nager

 

Old televisions, computers, tires, asbestos and toxic chemicals lie abandoned under a bridge near Acerra, Italy. While organized crime can blamed for much of the illegal toxic waste dumping from Northern Italian companies, local citizens have, as well, become accustomed to illegal dumping of waste leading to further contamination of the countryside. Photo by Matt Nager Old televisions, computers, tires, asbestos and toxic chemicals lie abandoned under a bridge near Acerra, Italy. While organized crime can blamed for much of the illegal toxic waste dumping from Northern Italian companies, local citizens have, as well, become accustomed to illegal dumping of waste leading to further contamination of the countryside. Photo by Matt Nager

Piles of illegally disposed refrigerators, computers, trash, and toxic chemicals lie abandoned next to a bridge and farm land near Marigliano, Italy. Surrounding farms have seen a drop in production quality of produce. While organized crime can blamed for much of the illegal toxic waste dumping from Northern Italian companies, local citizens have, as well, become accustomed to illegal dumping of waste leading to further contamination of the countryside. Photo by Matt Nager

Piles of illegally disposed televisions, computers, trash, and toxic chemicals lie abandoned next to an irrigation canal for local farms near Marigliano, Italy. Piles of urban waste can be found throughout the provinces of Naples and Caserta. Surrounding farms have seen a drop in production quality of produce. Photo by Matt Nager

Broken pieces of old building material containing asbestos and toxic chemicals lie abandoned under a bridge near Acerra, Italy. Once the asbestos is broken into small pieces it is easily absorbed into the ground entering water streams and other irrigation canals. While organized crime can blamed for much of the illegal toxic waste dumping from Northern Italian companies, local citizens have, as well, become accustomed to illegal dumping of waste leading to further contamination of the countryside. Photo by Matt Nager

Apartment buildings named Case Popolari were built to house families after the 1980 earthquake displaced families. It was about this time that illegal dumping of toxic waste from Northern Italian industries began, earning money for the region. Photo by Matt Nager

 

A mostly empty wall of the new addition to the city cemetery in Acerra, Italy, about 30 kilometers North of Naples, Italy. Acerra is one city within the Triangle of Death where the rise in illegal toxic waste disposal by the Camorra has led to a drastic rise in health and economic problems. With the rise in health, the city is expecting a rise in death and necessity of a larger cemetery. Photo by Matt Nager A mostly empty wall of the new addition to the city cemetery in Acerra, Italy, about 30 kilometers North of Naples, Italy. Acerra is one city within the Triangle of Death where the rise in illegal toxic waste disposal by the Camorra has led to a drastic rise in health and economic problems. With the rise in health, the city is expecting a rise in death and necessity of a larger cemetery. Photo by Matt Nager

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